Day of global Occupy protests gets underway in over 900 cities…

The Occupy Wall Street movement has inspired a day of worldwide protests in cities from Japan and South Korea to Australia. Organizers are planning non-violent demonstrations in 951 cities in Asia, Europe, South America and Africa as well as every state in the U.S.

A website called 15october.net urged the people of the world to “rise up” and “claim their rights and demand a true democracy.”

“Now it is time for all of us to join in a global non violent protest. The ruling powers work for the benefit of just a few, ignoring the will of the vast majority and the human and environmental price we all have to pay. This intolerable situation must end,” the website says.

Outside the central Reserve Bank of Australia 2,000 people, including representatives of Aboriginal groups, communists and trade unionists, protested.

“I think people want real democracy,” said Nick Carson, a spokesman for OccupyMelbourne.Org. “They don’t want corporate influence over their politicians. They want their politicians to be accountable.”

200 people in Japan marched outside the Tokyo Electric Power Co., which operates the tsunami-hit Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant, chanting anti-nuclear slogans, while opposing the U.S.-led Trans-Pacific Partnership free trade bloc that Japan is considering joining. “No to nuclear power,” the marchers chanted as they held up banners.

In Taiwan, over 100 people gathered at the Taipei 101 skyscraper, home to the stock market, chanting “we are Taiwan’s 99 percent”, saying economic growth had only benefited companies while middle-class salaries barely covered soaring housing, education and healthcare costs. Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Corp Chairman Morris Chang voiced his support telling reporters in the northern city of Hsinchu that Taiwan’s income gap was a serious issue.

“I’ve been against the gap between rich and poor,” Chang said. “The wealth of the top 1 percent has increased very fast in the past 20, 30 years. ‘Occupy Wall Street’ is a reaction to that. We have to take the issue seriously…”

In Manila, about 100 members of various groups under the Philippine left-wing alliance, Bayan, marched on the U.S. Embassy to express support for the Occupy Wall Street protests in the United States and to denounce “U.S. imperialism” and U.S.-led wars and aggression.

In South Korea, activists began gathering on the streets of Seoul. A coalition of 30 local civic groups planned to hold a two-day protest in the main financial district of Yeouido and other parts of the capital. The protesters, who have adopted slogans and imagery used by those in the U.S., say the rally is designed to motivate “99 percent of Koreans” to complain about the actions of the wealthiest “1 percent,” the paper said.

“The situation is the same in South Korea (as the U.S.), where the financial institutions have speculated to earn high profits in a short time, creating victims,” the coalition said in a statement, the Herald reported.

In Germany, where sympathy for southern Europe’s debt troubles is patchy, the financial center of Frankfurt and the European Central Bank in particular are expected to be a focus of marches called by the Real Democracy Now movement.

“I’ve been waiting for this protest for a long time, since 2008,” said Daniel Schreiber, 28, an editor in Berlin. “I was always wondering why people aren’t outraged and why nothing has happened and finally, three years later, it’s happening.”

 

 

Advertisements

Leave a comment

No comments yet.

Comments RSS TrackBack Identifier URI

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s