Santorum: “I don’t care what the unemployment rate is going to be”

If anything, republican presidential candidate Rick Santorum is honest, honest to a fault.

“I don’t care what the unemployment rate is going to be. It doesn’t matter to me. My campaign doesn’t hinge on unemployment rates and growth rates,” Santorum said during a campaign appearance in Illinois.

Santorum used his economic comments to attack fellow candidate Mitt Romney as not being a true conservative.

“We have one nominee who says he wants to run the economy. What kind of conservative says the president runs the economy? What kind of conservative says, ‘I’m the guy because of my economic experience that can create jobs? I don’t know. We conservatives generally think government doesn’t create jobs,” Santorum said.

Romney, a former private equity executive, has made his business experience the centerpiece of his presidential campaign, contending that it makes him the best candidate to steer the economy. His campaign leaped on Santorum’s remarks, saying that Santorum is an ‘economic lightweight.”

Santorum walked back from his comments later in remarks to reporters. “As far as my political campaign … of course I care about the unemployment rate. I want the unemployment rate to go down, but I’m saying my candidacy doesn’t hinge on whether the unemployment rate goes up and down. My candidacy is about something that transcends that; it’s about freedom. It’s not about Governor Romney’s idea that he is going to fix the economy,” he said.

The unemployment rate is currently 8.3 percent.

But really, who cares?

Santorum “The issue in this race is not the economy”

Rick Santorum’s presidential campaign to date has been about everything except the most important issues facing this country, so far the republican presidential hopeful has been content with given his version of America in regards to such topics as contraception, President Barack Obama’s theology, and pornography.

On Monday morning, Santorum kicked off a day of campaigning in Illinois by saying the following:

“The issue in this race is not the economy”.

That statement was part of a longer monologue about why Obamacare is a symbol of government overreach, and that Americans’ freedoms are eroding.

“The reason the economy is an issue in this race is because we have a government that is oppressing its people and taking away their freedom, and the economy is suffering as a result” Santorum said.

One supporter at the rally at The Venetian, an Italian-American social hall, said that the former Pennsylvania senator would “get soundbited on this.”

“It might have come out wrong,” said Peter Scordato, “He’s not downplaying the economy.”

Scordato said Santorum’s point was that the role of government in American life has become too big.

Another attendee said he was undecided before seeing Santorum speak, but came away impressed by his message.

“He spoke to what’s important about America: where we came from, where we’re going, how important our freedoms are,” said Al Piccirilli, 66, a construction project manager.

“Santorum speaks about what really touches the nerve in people,” he said.

Apparently what touches the nerve of Santorum supporters is not a corrupt banking system, a for profit healthcare system, endless wars or impending energy crisis.

It’s those damn pornographers responsible for the ills of society.

Rick Santorum ‘JFK speech on separation of church and state makes me want to throw up’

With the kind of comments Rick Santorum’s has been making on the campaign trail from how going to college makes you a freedom hating socialist, to why women shouldn’t be able to use contraceptives to how gay marriage destabilizes society you would think Mr. Santorum was auditioning for the role of American Taliban rather president of the United States.

Santorum’s latest statement is one you would imagine even his most ardent supporters would have to do a double take on.

“I don’t believe in an America where the separation of church and state are absolute,” he told ‘This Week’ host George Stephanopoulos. “The idea that the church can have no influence or no involvement in the operation of the state is absolutely antithetical to the objectives and vision of our country…to say that people of faith have no role in the public square? You bet that makes me want to throw up.”

The GOP candidate was responding to comments he made last October. He had said that he “almost threw up” after reading JFK’s 1960 speech in which he declared his commitment to the separation of church and state.

Santorum also on Sunday told Meet The Press host David Gregory that separation of church and state was “not the founders’ vision.”

Except that it was.

Last week he questioned President Obama’s faith.

“[Obama believes in] some phony ideal, some phony theology … not a theology based on the Bible, a different theology,” he said.

Michigan Tea Partier Says Getting College Education is Communism

Rick Santorum believes that President Obama’s plan to make college more accessible is just a plan to brainwash people into becoming liberals.

Most rationale people understand that at best these type of assertions are just hyperbole meant to rile up the GOP base and also at best are a clear demonstration as to why someone like Santorum is clearly un-electable.

But for the tea party crowd gathered at the Americans For Prosperity rally, Santorum’s words about higher education were right on target.

“President Obama wants everybody in America to go to college,” Santorum said. “What a snob!”

Santorum started by saying some people don’t require college to be successful.

“Not all folks are gifted the same way. Some people have incredible gifts with their hands.” He then went on to imply that Obama’s push to get more Americans to attend college was some kind of sinister plot.

“There are good, decent men and women who work hard every day and put their skills to the test that aren’t taught by some liberal college professor… That’s why he wants you to go to college. He wants to remake you in his image,” Santorum said. “I want to create jobs so people can remake their children into their image, not his.”

“I thought that was brilliant,” said Angie Clement of Commerce, Mich. “Not everybody has to go to college. We need garbagemen, we need welders, carpenters.”

“Everybody can’t be equal,” agreed Paul Murrow of Milford, MI seated nearby. “Somebody needs to do the manual labor.”

Clement’s husband, Stephen, said Santorum was right on the mark when he said that Obama wants to send kids to get college degrees to create more liberals.

“It starts down at the elementary school level with all this bullshit about diversity, pardon my French,” he said. “Diversity and sensitivity and all that crap. That’s the stuff that needs to be taught at home not by my teachers. My teachers need to be academic: Math, science, history, social studies, that sort of thing and keep political opinions out of it, bottom line.”

Stephen and Angie are middle-aged. Stephen said his two step kids are grown and one, his stepson, went to the University of Michigan and got an engineering degree, “but now he’s not using it. And that’s his choice.”

“I think he’s saying, ‘Do you think that that’s the only way you can be a successful person? To go to college?’” said another attendee, Elizabeth, who didn’t want her last name used. “That is snobbery. In this entrepreneurial country that we have, where fortunes are made in a lot of ways, they’re not only made by college-educated people.”

They all agreed that college can help some people, but they also believe that universities brainwash individuals into socialists.

“They try and disguise it with, you know, ‘equal opportunity’…” Stephen Clement began.

“It’s communism,” Murrow said, cutting him off. “The professors are all teaching the kids…”

“Where does the social engineering stop?” Clement added. “Does it stop after we send everybody to college, or does it stop after we set their curriculum and said, ‘these are the things you’re allowed to study?’ Does it become the Soviet Union?”

Rick Santorum Tells Sick Kid to Stop Whining About Drug Prices

GOP Presidential contender Rick Santorum had a heated exchange with a mother and her sick son Wednesday, saying that drug companies are entitled to charge whatever market demand dictates.

Santorum, who is the father of a child with a rare genetic disorder, said demand should determine the cost of medical therapies.

“People have no problem paying $900 for an iPad,” Santorum said, “but paying $900 for a  drug they have a problem with — it keeps you alive. Why? Because you’ve been conditioned to think health care is something you can get without having to pay for it.”

The mother said her son was on the drug Abilify, used to treat schizophrenia, and on paper, its costs would exceed $1 million dollars a year.

Santorum said drugs take years to develop and cost millions of dollars to produce, and manufacturers need to turn a profit or they would stop developing new drugs.

“You have that drug, and maybe you’re alive today because people have a profit motive to make that drug,” Santorum said. “There are many people sick today who, 10 years from now, are going to be alive because of some drug invented in the next 10 years. If we say: ‘You drug companies are greedy and bad, you can’t make a return on your money,’ then we will freeze innovation.”

Santorum said he sympathized with the boy’s case, but also believed in the marketplace.

“He’s alive today because drug companies provide care,” Santorum said. “And if they didn’t think they could make money providing that drug, that drug wouldn’t be here. I sympathize with these compassionate cases. … I want your son to stay alive on much-needed drugs. Fact is, we need companies to have incentives to make drugs. If they don’t have incentives, they won’t make those drugs. We either believe in markets or we don’t.”